Accessible Fashion – Lagenlook 

Over the past year I’ve been struggling with clothes on a number of levels. My mission has been to find clothes that meet ALL of the following:

  1. Are stylish & individual, but not “fashionable” (I’m 36 fgs, my teenage clothes are now “retro”)
  2. I can get on & off without dislocating & with minimal help
  3. Are comfortable EVEN when my joints ache, my belly bloats by several inches for no good reason, I’m sat in my wheelchair all day, I’m sitting awkwardly because of my weird bendy back
  4. I can get out of to go to the loo.by myself (big, important consideration even if this is way TMI)
  5. Won’t tangle in my wheelchair 
  6. Won’t be too hot & make me Tachy
  7. Won’t be too cold & turn me to stone
  8. Are considered modest enough for work
  9. Aren’t frumpy
  10. Won’t fuel my “I’m fat” thoughts

So, you know, I’m Easy.

But over the past few weeks, I’ve found a style that rather meets all of this. Lagenlook is a German creation which literally means layered look. It is a style of dressing that flatters almost all figures and sticks two big fingers up at the perfect body type. That rather suits me seeing as the body I once adorned with home sewn flared dungarees so enormous that I used to trip over the hems seems to have spread out, twisted, & broken. I digress.

The look can be adjusted to suit whatever your particular style is (for me, I’m more the 2nd lady in from the left without the standing, and some extra padding). In my case my colour choices are black, grey, natural greens, and the occasional royal blue for funsies.

So today, Mr Geek took me & the kids over to Brighton to address the lack of uniform shopping for the kids & identify some items to stop me making a face every time he gets me dressed & bemoaning my lack of clothes that don’t either hurt my stomach or look frumpy.

Each morning I’m greeted with “what do you want to wear?”, and without fail the answer has been “something comfortable”. This is going to suck when I go back to work and I have to dress in smart & professional clothing. This is great in theory, but when you’re battling a body that has wild temperature fluctuations & inflates because you smelt a bread roll, a pencil skirt isn’t practical.

Lagenlook solves the looking like a human with some form of style, and because of the layers I can add or remove layers as and when needed. The majority of the bits I bought allow me to wear leggings or linen trousers underneath which is where I come a little bit unstuck – our dress code states no leggings – I can’t successfully undo trousers & get to the loo by myself (apart from my linen trousers which are elasticated which breaks my heart, but hey). I’m hoping if they are worn as a type of completely opaque tights, I can get away with it.

I think I’d always planned this Bonham Carter-esq look as my midlife crisis style of choice anyway & looking through my pre-shopping wardrobe there’s already a few petticoats, DMs, and cardigans just waiting to be layered up. And I guess 36 is an ok age to have a midlife existential crisis. I’d always planned to have to go and “find myself” in Tibet where I would meditate and plan my sky burial.

Instead, I am finding peace through painkillers and the acquisition of comfortable clothes in Primark. I’m a terrible hippy. I will however happily settle for expressing my repressed rebellion through slightly odd clothing & my trademark super red hair.

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The Acquisition of Wooly Treasure

Clothing is easy to come by these days. You can buy a multitude of different styles at the click of a button from all over the globe. But how much do we really love our clothes now? Are they just throw away items that can be replaced by the next fashionable round of cheap material sewn together by people we’d rather not think about?

I have a handful of items that I love dearly and couldn’t bear to part with. I have many more that are nearly sensible coverings for my body.

My no.1 item are my enormous flared jeans. They’re not actually jeans, they are a denim look cotton with cotton lined pockets and waist, a high waist and three massive colourful buttons up the front. Unsurprisingly, I made them. They are made to my exact shape and are one of the most comfortable things I own. I wanted to find some photos of them, so checked back on my Facebook albums. It turns out I made them two years ago!

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And I can add to the list my newly created lopapeysa jumper. Another homemade favourite. I’ve already spent hours fussing over this jumper, but having worn it for the past two days in the newly chilly weather, I’m in love. And love is…. toasty.

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So, it turns out, the stuff we love the most is the stuff we poured our heart and soul into creating. BeanPole is following a similar train of thought with her special bits. The ones that mummy made for her (TinyPants is a knitted by Nana girl).

Another lopapeysa, but this time with a special Linux Penguin theme from last year which still has some wear in it.

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And the all important unicorn hat which was the talk of the playground (not all good, but they soon shut up when asked what their mummy spent hours knitting just for them).

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So it turns out that the love you feel for your clothes is directly proportional to the love that went into creating them. It’s quality, not quantity. Unless it’s shoes.