Don’t Touch My Wheelchair

There’s been a lot going on recently and within those busy moments there are flashes of white hot fight or flight temper. As a rule, the flash remains in my head & I either bury it, or explain calmly after, but all flashes have a common theme: don’t touch my chair.

For ease of reading:
I have Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; a genetic condition which affects connective tissues throughout my body making them stretchier than they should be (this includes tendons, ligaments, skin, muscle, internal organs). I dislocate or sublux (partially dislocate) daily and it hurts. EDS comes with the extra fun of IBS (irritable bowel), POTS (Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia), and for me, dysphagia (difficulty swallowing). Because of the pain, hip & pelvis subluxations, and fainting I use a wheelchair pretty much full time aside from trips to the loo upstairs where I use crutches to drag myself the full exciting 5m.

So, my chair is my mobility, it’s my pain relief, it’s my route to remaining conscious! So why the anger? May I give this in a few formal requests? (I’m going to anyway, that was more to allow for a personified narrative – I could almost pass my SATS with that paragraph…)

Don’t push my chair without asking
Sam, my ever understanding lady summed this up in words even the 7 year old demanding to push me around like an oversized doll understood.
“You don’t push someone’s wheelchair unless they ask you to. You wouldn’t let someone puck you up without asking would you? It’s just rude.”
I make a habit of having my handles on the chair tucked away because I hate it.

Firstly, it makes me feel very vulnerable when someone physically moves me either unexpectedly or against my will.
Secondly, I generally have my hands on the rims & if you move me forwards without warning, I may still be gripping and you’ll have a dislocated shoulder, elbow, or wrist on your conscience.

Mr Geek forgot himself today and did just this. He whizzed me up a ramp onto the train without warning & faced a very stern don’t touch my bloody chair conversation. Mainly because I was tired, in pain, and having been in ultra-alert mummy in London mode all day couldn’t tell who was pushing and panicked.

Don’t  pin my pain on the aid that relieves it
My pain management team appear to be at a professional crossroads. If they were married you would probably suggest seeing a counsellor. Instead, they played a game of professional ping pong with my appointment which as a professional, I found deeply unsettling.
One of the ladies is a pain specialist. She is quiet, encourages my progress (albeit slow), advocates pacing and patience.  The other is a lead physio who is very much the opposite. She is an advocate of movement, and pushing through limits, and overcoming mental barriers. Personally, I find her overbearing and generally cannot get a word in edgeways.

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When I saw them this week I happened to be circling the higher eschalons of the pain scale. I find it difficult to articulate my needs when I’m breathing through it. I’d managed to explain jy fears about loss of sensation (boiling water on the foot) which was taken seriously, and lack of sexual function which was dealt with in true British fashion.

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Whilst demonstrating a move to help me open up my pelvis & lower back, she noticed that I was uncomfortable in the chair. And here it came:
We must get you out of that chair. Being sat in that is what is making your back hurt!” Now, to an extent I do agree. Being sat still watching a loud person wave their legs in the air for 45 mins makes your joints seize up. Anatomically, the seated position does put pressure on your lower spine. So I asked her how we would work on that.
What’s about standing up at work?”
We’re going with a no there; I’ve already fainted in my classroom twice this term despite being sat in my wheelchair  and that’s scary for both me and the kids. In fact, it’s what prompted me to get the reclining back for the powerchair.
Can’t you just walk around at home?”
I’d love to! It’s my ultimate goal to abandon the chair in the house, but standing feels like there’s glass in my hips & walking with crutches not only causes pain (and tears), but runs the very real risk of a fall as I can’t feel my feet & have to really focus on where I’m putting my legs.
OK then, but we need you to open up that area, so lying down flat as much as possible with lots of stretching”
Again, unlikely at work (Just picture that classroom scene!), but doable at home… but stretch as far as possible?!
Earlier, she’d been quite offended when I told them that my Stanmore referral was rejected due to waiting lists & I felt left in limbo. She scribbled  furiously whilst telling me sharply that she dealt with plenty of Hypermobility & didn’t need London telling us what to do (🚨🔔AWOOOGA! Alarm Bells!🔔🚨).

This all sounds like a cop out, but I know my body & that pain in my hips & back isn’t from the chair (unless it can time travel back to 2004 when my 1st disc went). I also know that pain is not gain with EDS, and when I “push through”, I end up damaging something.  I do push myself physically by hauling my arse to wheelchair racing & swimming each week. I use the manual chair when I’m not at work, self propelling to the point of exhaustion & audibly clicking shoulders.

I’m doing my best, but sitting allows me to function. The chair damn well stays. I will not be confined to bed & stop working so I can point my toes again.

If at all possible, I’d like to enter the building the same way as everyone else, not via an extra 1/4 mile walk and via the bins.

Part of our lovely day out in London was dinner (we had hoped it would be celebratory, but we won’t hear about vague thing we cant talk about yet until tomorrow or Monday). As a special treat, we’d booked a table at Marco Pierre White’s Italian restaurant on the South Bank. I was beside myself with excitement as I love some of the TV stuff he does.
The entrance was beautiful with just 8 minor issues – all of them steps. The solution was to walk to the back of the hotel where there is a ramp.

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And bins. And no clue on how to get in.

Once in, it was just bliss! The staff were helpful & made every effort to accommodate us. And the food. Heaven! I utterly second MP’S recommendation of the bolognaise pizza!

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If I need help, look where you’re going!
I started writing this blog post about 12.30 am & it’s now 3.15am. Why aren’t I asleep?! Well, earlier Mr Geek helped me down a curb by easing me down backwards, misjudged the height, didn’t see the hold in the road & the chair dropped down the height of the curb plus hole.

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As my wheel touched down, my left hip popped out (unusual, it’s usually my right side) & I yelped. And swore. Then used the chair to wiggle it back in & had a little cry. Painkillers were duly administered & I assured poor Mr Geek that it really wasn’t his fault. Yes, he’s a bit clumsy & cakhanded, but London appears to have not mastered the art of the drop curb yet…

… and where they have included a drop curb, Southwark  Council has a funny idea of the best place to situate recycling bins.

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12 hours and 3 doses of dihydrocodeine  & oramorph later and I still have knives in my hip and sleep arrives in 10 minute naps until the muscles relax & go back into spasm & wake me up again.

Other quick & easy ones.
Please don’t move my chair out of reach if I’m on the sofa. Ffs.

No you can’t ‘have a go in it’

Please don’t suggest adaptations, then get huffy when I say no. I know you’re trying to help, but I’ve got it set up my way and tyres “just” 1/4 inch thicker will rub against my skin.

Also, don’t touch my chair.

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4 thoughts on “Don’t Touch My Wheelchair

  1. Oh my goodness! Yes! I have such an emotional attachment to my chair (Her name is Snookie). I was offended and a bit furious when my inlaws called to “let me know” they would be borrowing it for my mother in law. (In her defense, she had just broken a hip, BUT in my defense- those are MY freakin wheels!) I digress. Thanks for writing this. It’s nice to know that I’m not being a super diva. I hope the pain management stand-off comes to a helpful conclusion soon.

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  2. Oh dear lord. It doesn’t surprise me that people want to help, but it would be nice if they offered, rather than just do it. And what is with London not being more up to date on things like dropped curves? It is old enough to know better. 🙂 Stick with the pain management lady. And I hope it all works, and soon you get some relief. Pointing toes is over rated.

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  3. Argh. On the note of awful physio, have you managed to see any specialist? after five years of bouncing around I managed to see Dr kazkaz within a matter of months. She’s suggested the stanmore residential thing but advised that the list is closed right now but reopening over summer x

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    • My referral to her was rejected, but I saw Dr Mittal who she works with privately.
      With work & kids, the residential thing isn’t suitable for me, but I’d happily travel there to see their physio team. So far, the people here are advising without even attempting to see what I can actually do (she’s only seen my in the chair & asked me questions)

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